“In Her Genes” by James Brody – paperback ($14)/electronic ($10). Amazon/Kindle

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About In Her Genes by James Brody – paperback ($14)/electronic ($10). Amazon/Kindle http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=%22In+her+genes%22&rh=n%3A283155%2Ck%3A%22In+her+genes%22

“The hand on men’s evolutionary steering wheel is female, it begins its work during courtship and pregnancy, and it steers all of us between our conception and death. As anthropologist Sarah Hrdy put it: “ . . to an extraordinary degree, the predilection of the investing sex – females – potentially determine the direction in which the species will evolve. For it is the female who is the ultimate arbiter of when she mates and how often and with whom.” (1981, 18)

This book tattles on women who lie and supports itself with information from statistical physics and developmental biology. That is, there are “big” reasons for fibs, alibis, and half-truths. They also fit a very common pattern, can be seen as the oldest “adaptations,” and my collection of stories affirms the utility of women’s fibs.

I also recognize the contributions that come from a sorcerer’s apprentice, “genomic imprinting,” a tool that manages the conflicts between a father’s demand for larger, louder offspring and the mother’s for kids who are cheap to keep.

There is order underlying the chaos that is now abundant in human societies.

For example, impulsive people again have the majority in America and swap votes for governmental favors. I doubt that passionate warnings from Spengler, Hayek, Brimerlow, Bork, Steyn, Hanson, Codavilla, Copley, or anyone else will help. And Spengler and Toynbee may have been correct about the “Fall of the West” but for reasons they didn’t know, reasons that underlie not only personal development but also the conflicts between rural and urban dwellers and the growth and collapse of cultures.

As Alfred Lotka put it in 1925:
“… the drama of life is like a puppet show in which stage, scenery, actors and all are made of the same stuff. The players, indeed, ‘have their exits and their entrances,’ but the exit is by way of translation into the substance of the stage; and each entrance is a transformation scene. So stage and players are bound together in the close partnership of an intimate comedy; and if we would catch the spirit of the piece, our attention must not all be absorbed in the characters alone, but must be extended also to the scene, of which they are born, or on which they play their part, and with which, in a little while, they merge again.” (Lotka, Alfred (1925/1956) Elements of Mathematical Biology. NY: Dover. (original title: Elements of Physical Biology), 183–184)

ABOUT JB

Doc, no surprise, is a little strange, an arranger-assembler who thinks mostly about systems and organizations even while he watches girls. He believes that network physics describes not only fluids near absolute zero but also the crowds in a theater or on a city street. Doc is, thus, a “things person” rather than a “people person.” He usually eats with his cat.

Doc is also a scientist and clinician.

His sculpture professor in college said that Doc was “one of the best” but asked him to simplify his work in order to be sure that Doc was in control of everything that he did. Doc tried but plans emerged from his materials and Doc needed the clay, wood, and steel to guide him instead of the reverse. Fifty years later, he still tends to fantasize, clutter and rearrange what he finds, and the delete, backspace, and escape keys are his neglected best friends. In this way he created stories that pivot around the mixed roles acted by women and men: Women who lie to benefit their males, women who act like men, and men who work in the government or the media and act like women.

He had five publications before he finished graduate school and his dissertation on the behavioral effects of serotonin drew 1300 requests for copies in a time when the average dissertation drew ten. It was published immediately in Psychopharmacologia and without editorial corrections. Doc published his postdoctoral work – behavior effects of microinjections of glutamic acid – in Nature and elicited 600 requests for copies.

He designed behavior interventions for residents of state institutions and drew his uplifts from attending conferences, organizing workshops, publishing training manuals, training medical staff, writing book reviews, and starting and managing an online forum on human evolution. He has worked with notables such as Howard Bloom, Robert Wright, Frank Sulloway, Nancy Segal, Russell Gardner, John Price, Dylan Evans, and John Pearce.

Doc later monitored special education classes as a member of a Right to Education Task Force  and served as Assistant Superintendent at one residential facility and Acting Superintendent at a second where he also was Director of Psychology and EDP Coordinator. (He also earned a quadruple by-pass during this assignment.) During these years, he taught workshops on evolutionary clinical psychology for CIA MH staff, the US Office of Personnel Management, and for the state psychology associations (Pennsylvania and Maryland).

His current mistress is a Dell laptop, a Nikon D7100 (he has given several shows) and, at 71, he pilots a Honda CBR1000RR and several MR2s.


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